Virus in the air

The novel coronavirus—now officially named COVID-19 by the World Health Organization—is already impacting air travel worldwide.  I’m about to take off for South Africa and wondering what precautions I should take. Will there be virus in the air while I’m in the air?  Will I need face masks?  Do masks even work?

I was already concerned about whether my connecting flights on South African Express would be canceled, as I wrote about two weeks ago.   Now COVID-19 comes along, though as of today cases are not yet reported anywhere on the vast African continent, let alone the Republic of South Africa.

I never used to worry about catching something on a plane.  Winter after winter over four decades I crammed in beside ill travelers sneezing virus-laden mucus particles airborne while airborne at 35,000 feet with nowhere to hide. I usually didn’t get sick myself, and I never thought twice about sharing the sardine can with a bunch of sick people.  The airlines let anybody on board as long as they proffered a valid ticket.

Obsessed with work and anxious that I might be fired for not showing up, I myself once flew with the flu.  It was in the early eighties when people still smoked on planes, so many passengers were hacking and coughing per usual.  No one noticed that I sounded and looked like death warmed over.  I sat in the back of the plane with the nicotine addicts like me (before I quit cold turkey in 1985).  Didn’t even get a second look.

No one wore a mask then, either.  Certainly wearing face masks is a newish air travel phenomenon that became widespread during the 2003 SARS outbreak. SARS lasted about six months, but the habit of fearing face masks on board planes, particularly in Asia, persisted.  The 2012 MERS outbreak saw the face mask habit resurge, though not so much in the USA that I recall.

But we Americans are up to date on the mask routine now.  I’ve seen pictures lately of U.S. airplanes on domestic routes with lots of flyers wearing masks, so the habit seems to have taken hold quickly here.  Makes me wonder how many travelers are just being cautious, and how many are sniffling and really sick. 

Either way, I thought it prudent to take some masks with me to wear—just in case—on the 16 hour flight from Atlanta to South Africa.  But checking Amazon two weeks ago, I was not able to buy masks.  And nearby local pharmacies have been out since January.

Out already?  Really?  There are only a few known cases yet in this country.

Guess I shouldn’t be too surprised.  Reports are that COVID-19 has caused face masks to become a scarce commodity across the globe. China reportedly makes over half the world’s medical face masks, and domestic demand there far exceeds supply. 

Panic buying has gobbled up what surplus there was here, it seems.  So much so that I heard an expert on the BBC opine yesterday that the shortage could shut down surgeries and routine medical procedures in clinics and hospitals everywhere.

All of which made me wonder if I even need to wear a mask on a plane, or if the masks are at all effective.  A Washington Post report says I shouldn’t fret as long I am not too close to someone spraying nasal droplets through sneezes.  More than two seats away is probably safe, as this WaPo graphic indicates:

Graphic by the Washington Post

Heck, the BBC says wearing a mask isn’t that effective against airborne viruses because the masks don’t shield the eyes and are not tight against the face, either.  Masks are probably pretty good at preventing hand-to-mouth transmission of germs, though.

Still, like Linus in Peanuts, I will feel better with a security blanket despite facts to the contrary.  My doctor provided me with a dozen high quality N95 face masks which give me comfort for the upcoming trip.

I just hope I don’t need them.

Schlepping to the airport

Barring impractical modes of transport, such as hiring a Tibetan yak and drover, I tried every possible means of getting to and from RDU Airport over the five decades leading up to the present 2020s. What worked best in the beginning doesn’t work so well now. In fact, what works well now didn’t even exist forty years ago.

Yak photo
“This yak’s for you!”  Saddled up and ready to take you to the airport.

Over the years I have dabbled in these mobility methods:

1. Public transit bus
2. Renting a car for the weekend Friday night and returning it Sunday afternoon
3. Being dropped off and picked up by friends or family
4. Driving and parking my own car
5. Taxi
6. Black car service
7. TNC (Uber or Lyft)

What those seven have in common is rubber tires rolling on asphalt. RDU has no rail service to the airport and probably never will. Despite the booming Research Triangle, we don’t have the population density and ridership to justify the very high infrastructure cost of a light rail or commuter rail option.

The Triangle and surrounding municipalities are also—shamefully—the poster child of sprawl, meaning low residential density and car-dependency. So, it’s either rubber tires or yak travel.

Not being Chicago, L.A. or New York also means no helicopter option. We do have a couple of local billionaires in the area, but too few super-rich live in the Raleigh-Durham-Cary-Chapel Hill metro zone to have attracted a private chopper service.

I guess I could have tried walking or biking…nah, what am I saying? Nobody bikes to the airport.

Well, except at Schiphol in Amsterdam, where parking bikes is free for up to four weeks.

Biking at Schiphol
Gotta love the Dutch devotion to cycling!

RDU Airport is not that far from all the places in Raleigh I’ve lived since the 1970s: about 15-18 miles via I-40. Depending on time and day, the trip can be a breeze at 20 minutes or a slow-motion 45-60 minute nightmare of bumper-to-bumper congestion.

Point is, that no matter which of the seven means I listed above, I’m still in traffic—rubber tires rolling on asphalt.

In the early days I usually drove my car and parked. That was the 1970s, when parking at RDU was plentiful and daily costs low. Traffic wasn’t such a hassle like it is now, either.

For a few years Avis, Hertz, and Alamo at RDU were desperate to rent cars over weekends and would drop daily rates to as little as $15 for full-size cars. Even with taxes and fees, renting from them Friday-Sunday was cheaper than driving my own car and parking it all week, so I had a new car every weekend.

But even when Avis would upgrade me at no cost (as a Presidents Club member) to a big Caddy or when Hertz boosted me for free to a Mercedes, I was still driving myself, and traffic wasn’t getting any better.

Gradually, as traffic worsened, I wearied of driving, and my airport mobility preferences skewed to someone else driving.

I tried the bus, and it worked well, and still does, but the “first mile-last mile” problem of public transit meant I had to walk or get a ride to the nearest bus stop, which is within walking distance, but difficult with luggage. I still take the bus occasionally, which operates every 30 minutes, and I enjoy it. Just $2.25. And now it’s free for me on a Senior Pass. One downside: The airport buses don’t run at 4:00 AM if I have an early flight.

Taxi service over the last forty years has been sporadically reliable. Taking a cab was always good getting home from RDU because of the permanent taxi stand at the terminal.

However, getting to the airport at 4:00 AM on a Monday for a 6:00 AM flight meant having to trust that the taxi I ordered Sunday night would show up. Often one didn’t, and then I’d have to drive myself.

That led me to try the expensive private limo route, which in big cities is called “black car service.” I’ve often used black cars in places like San Francisco, and I love the luxury and comfort and reliability. Never once had a no-show. But in Raleigh the service was not always on time, which meant I was paying a 50-100% premium cost over a taxi for nothing. I don’t do black cars in Raleigh any more.

Once in a while I got a ride from my patient and wonderful wife or from a friend who would brave the drive to RDU.  Naturally, though, getting a ride was more opportunistic than routine.

Then came TNCs—Transportation Network Companies, like Uber and Lyft. I used them in bigger burgs first before trying them in Raleigh, but soon came to the conclusion that on-demand rides might be a long-term, permanent solution to getting to and from the airport. The $15 monthly use-it-or-lose-it Uber credit that comes with my AmEx Platinum Card certainly prompts me to choose Uber first, but I like both car services.

in summary, here are my 2020 comparisons of cost and convenience to and from RDU using those seven modes:

1. Public transit bus – Just $2.25 ($4.50 round trip, or free for seniors); runs every 30 minutes, but not real early; convenient drop and pickup locations at RDU; distance to and from my local bus stop is not convenient. OVERALL 2020 RATING – inconvenience makes this not a routine option.

2. Renting a car for the weekend Friday night and returning it Sunday afternoon – Weekend rates are not what they used to be, and taxes and fees can now almost double the basic rate; otherwise, very convenient. OVERALL 2020 RATING – expense makes this not a routine option.

3. Being dropped off and picked up by friends or family – OVERALL 2020 RATING – great when it happens, but certainly not a routine option.

4. Driving and parking my own car – In 2019 the RDU Airport Authority increased the daily rates at all of the airport’s parking lots. In the main parking decks between the terminals—the decks I’ve used for years—the closest spaces went from $18 per day to $22, while less convenient deck spaces increased from $14 a day to $15.  That means up to $110 for a five-day trip and a max of $154 for a week away.

Okay, cheaper than big cities, but, hey, this is Raleigh, and that’s a lot of dough to park. Especially after having to endure the horrible I-40 congestion driving my own car. OVERALL 2020 RATING – inconvenience of driving, plus higher-than-ever expense makes this not a routine option; however, this is always the optimal backup mode if all else fails.

5. Taxi – Cabs are plentiful at the terminals, and it is a short, convenient walk, even closer than the parking decks. Also reasonably priced (about $25-35 including tip to get home, depending on traffic), and I don’t have to drive myself, which is by itself worth a premium. However, getting to the airport is a crap shoot, as drivers do not always show up on time, or show up at all. OVERALL 2020 RATING – thumbs up for getting from RDU to home, but uncertainty makes this not a routine option for travel to RDU.

6. Black car service – Without using the service again I cannot affirm that pickups are more reliable than they were, but prices remain roughly twice that of taxis. OVERALL 2020 RATING – high price combined with pickup unreliability makes this not a routine option.

7. TNC (Uber or Lyft) – Not having to drive myself is a big plus. Convenient and transparent service in that I can always see on my smartphone app map whether cars are available.  So far my experience has been that even at very early morning hours like 4:00 cars are cruising nearby waiting for customer signals. Rates are almost always lower than taxis, too, about $20-25 with tip to get home or to RDU. OVERALL 2020 RATING – Cheap, reliable, convenient, and someone else is driving:  Uber and Lyft are my current preferred options to get to and from the airport.

What will getting to the airport be like in ten years? According to futurist Tony Seba, who was the keynote speaker at the recent North Carolina Department of Transportation Summit, the convergence of on-demand services like Uber and Lyft with electric vehicles and fully-automated (driver-less) vehicles will, by 2040, lead to a world in which private car ownership plummets as every person can depend on what he call TaaS (Transportation as a Service).

To understand what Seba means, I highly recommend this video from the NCDOT Transportation Summit.

Tony Seba’s presentation begins at 26:00.

What he predicts seems inevitable to me. On-demand services like Uber and Lyft are already my top means of schlepping to RDU. It will be even better when the cars are fully automated, electric, and ubiquitous.

Driving, not flying, to Kruger National Park

As my many previous blog posts evince, I love going to the Kruger National Park in South Africa. After my first Kruger visit in 1991 when I was working in South Africa, I was hooked for life.

I am going again in late February.  Usually I fly to the Kruger from Johannesburg, but it looks like I might have to drive this time instead.

Back in the early 90s I lived in Johannesburg and had a leased car, so I frequently drove the five hour trip to reach the Park whenever I wanted to visit.  Since then, however, I fly to Jo’burg (JNB) and catch a connecting flight to the Kruger.

The only way to get there by air from Johannesburg is on South African Express Airways.

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SA Express ERJ bound for Johannesburg awaits passenger boarding at Skukuza Airport.

SA Express flies from Jo’burg to two airports accessing the Kruger:  Modern Mpumalanga Nelspruit/Kruger International Airport (MQP) opened in 2002, and charming little Skukuza Airport (SZK) dates from 1958.  Skukuza is tiny and beautiful (voted the world’s prettiest airport by Forbes in 2018 after a ten year rebuild).

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Skukuza Airport waiting area is open to the African wilderness.

SZK is actually inside the Kruger Park, so I am already there when we touch the tarmac.  From MQP I can be in the Park in about 45 minutes after picking up my rental car.

SA Express, with its small fleet of RJs that serves domestic markets in South Africa, holds a monopoly on the MQP and SZK routes. Like big brother South African Airways, SA Express is wholly owned and managed by the government.  Unlike big brother, however, SA Express has no competition on the routes it flies.

The fact that SA Express is the sole means of flying between Johannesburg and the Kruger National Park has never bothered me because the service has always been reliable and the connecting fares reasonable (about $250 round trip JNB to MQP, and around $300 from JNB into more convenient SKZ).

Never bothered me, that is, until now.  Seems SA Express, like big brother SAA, may be close to collapse.  Recent (late January, 2020) media accounts state matter-of-factly that years of mismanagement have brought both the big and little state-run airlines to this point:

SAA

SA EXPRESS

 

And this January 23rd piece details a rancorous dispute between SA Express and one creditor and clearly explains the problem baby brother has with alliance partner SAA:

 

“The fact that national carrier SAA has been placed in business rescue [bankruptcy] is risking the viability of another state-owned airline, SA Express, according to court documents filed last week. …

“The documents … reveal that while SA Express and SAA are separate businesses, SA Express is a creditor of SAA. Business rescue practitioners of SAA have confirmed this.

 “SA Express is an alliance partner of SAA, and is dependent on it for code sharing and related services. ‘SAA sells tickets on behalf of SA Express and pays SA Express once passengers have travelled,’ Ziegler’s affidavit reads.

 “According to [the] affidavit, SAA owed SA Express approximately R20m [about $1.4 million], before the national carrier was placed in business rescue in December 2019.

 “Three creditors have filed separate liquidation applications, SA Express owes them more than R34m [about $2.4 million], the affidavit showed.”

On top of which, the South African Auditor-General’s reported that SA Express lost R590m (over $41 million) for the 2018/19 financial year.

Reading all these reports caused me more than abstract angst because of my upcoming Kruger National Park visit in February.  I fly Delta to Johannesburg, with onward flights booked and paid for from Johannesburg to Skukuza via SA Express.

Since the SA Express financial problems indicate the strong possibility that my JNB/SZK flights will be canceled, I thought a backup car rental would be prudent.  A few keystrokes at the Avis website did the trick.  Now if the worst happens, I will be driving an Avis car on the five hour overland journey from Johannesburg airport to Skukuza.

Just like I used to do in 1991.

Air travel video “trip reports”

“He’s no David Attenborough.”

That was the totality of my wife’s dismissive commentary after watching one of the thousands of air travel “trip reports” on YouTube.  Her words trailed off as she hurriedly hoofed it from the room, clearly peeved that I had wasted her time by inviting a look.

She’s right, of course.  The amateurish nature of many YouTube vids can be awfully grating.

However, before choosing an airline, class of service, or route I haven’t flown before, I do my homework.  Lately I’ve begun supplementing my research beyond blogs, seatguru.com, sites like Points Guys, and similar sources by taking a deeper dive into video trip reports.

Ubiquitous YouTube flight reviews are nothing new, but I ignored them until recently.  Then I found I enjoyed one by Paul Lucas, prompting me to poke around for others.

Who knew there were so many?  See my list below of 26 in the pantheon of air travel trip report videographers.

It’s such a popular thing to do that there are even videos on how to make a trip report.

My curiosity fueled, I binge-watched off and on for two months.  After that immersion, some of my takeaways:

  • Every flight, every airline, every route, and every aircraft seems to be covered by someone.
  • It’s easy to find what you want by querying reviews every which way: by vlogger, by airline, by route, and/or by class of service.
  • In most cases, multiple reviews exist for everything.  For example, I stopped counting after finding 300 YouTube trip report videos just for TAP Air Portugal.
  • I reached a point of diminishing returns after watching more than five or six videos of whatever I was looking for because vloggers seem to draw much the same conclusions about the airline, aircraft, route, and service they are reviewing.
  • Some vloggers, like Paul Lucas, promise to be honest, and Lucas, at least, reveals when he gets discounts or freebies.
  • Most trip report videos cover the entire experience from airport check-in to lounge to boarding to in-flight experience (seats, meals, IFE, etc.) to arrival at the destination airport.
  • The majority of reports review business class, but there are loads of economy class reviews, too.  Not many reviews of international first class since it is going the way of the dodo.
  • Most trip reports are 12-20 minutes, with a few shorter and not many longer.
  • The cinematography and editing on most range from  pretty good to extremely well done, and in some cases nearly professional.

POSITIVES

I am a fan of the Paul Lucas “Wingin’ It!” posts because his voiceover descriptions are not grating like some, and his review elements are consistent.

I found the trip reports in economy to be especially interesting.  Maybe that’s because I hope to discover a coach cabin with tolerable seating and decent service on very long-haul international flights. (I’m still looking.)

I most enjoyed the ones with no talking. That is, the nonverbal, captioned reports appeal to me more than most of the voiceovers.

Most video trip reports are useful and entertaining to some degree.

All the videos add to or reinforce what I know about business and economy flying, particularly premium cabin experiences on airlines I have not flown, like Kenya Airways and Ethiopian Air, that sometimes offer discounted business fares.

Many of the vloggers post what they paid and how they wangled the fare.  I discovered, for example, that booking directly on the KLM site is the cheapest way to get to Johannesburg in business class and is via Kenya Air. The Google ITA Matrix site doesn’t tell me that.

Paul Lucas masters low premium cabin fares by using VPNs that don’t reveal American or British origin. Seems legal, and better than what I can find. Others reveal similar tricks that save considerable money on Business Class fares.

NEGATIVES

Some trip reports are terrible.  Just poorly done and biased.  Some are embarrassing to view.

The videos always care more about the food than I do.  I don’t expect the Beluga caviar I used to get in the eighties on Singapore Air in First Class.

On the other hand, the reports never seem to care enough about the wines.  Any old red or white seems palatable to all the vloggers, no matter what swill is being poured.  They don’t appreciate the differences among Champagne served, either.

And they always harp on the amenity kits.

I mean, amenity kits?  Really?  I’ve never seen the contents of one that amazed me: toothbrush, toothpaste, eyeshades, earplugs, cheap socks, sometimes a comb, weird body lotions I’ll never use, once in a while a flimsy razor and minuscule tube of shaving cream.  Useful stuff mostly, but not worthy of a video review.

Never once did I unzip a kit to find a Mexican Red-Legged Tarantula crawling out onto my hand.  Now that would be a surprise.

Image result for red legged tarantula"

Let alone find something outstanding in an amenity kit, like a solid gold coin.

How about at least a passcode for free in-flight wifi?

Another gripe: The vloggers seem predisposed to liking the flights they aim to review.  That is to say, I don’t recall seeing a report framed with much objectivity or skepticism.  Instead, reviewers are altogether too effervescent about the whole experience (“Oh boy, I am flying in QATAR’S NEW Q SUITE TODAY, THE BEST IN THE WORLD!!!!”).

Spare me, please, the histrionics.  Just give me the experiential facts.

Sometimes a reviewer will comment vaguely about the amount of legroom in coach or business, but specifics like pitch and seat width elude the videographers.  It would be useful to have such information incorporated into reports as well a comparative analysis to other airline and aircraft cabin layouts.

I observed, too, that reviewers tend to critique the interior colors of airplane cabins, in my view only an abstract element of a flight’s overall experience.  I am more interested in seat comfort, privacy, and on-board service than the shade of gray on the bulkhead.

Overall, most video trip reports only focus on a few elements important to me, such as flight attendant demeanor. I remember, for instance, that a Cathay Pacific cabin crew in Business Class HKG/ORD several years ago was cold, remote, and the service perfunctory. That has stayed with me much more than the exemplary privacy and comfort of the Cathay Business Class cabin.

So which vloggers are reliable and for what purpose, if at all?

Well, all the videos have some utility.  The superficiality of most trip reports do not prevent me from seeing firsthand the check-in procedures, lounges, boarding procedures, cabin layouts, amenities, and on-board service of many airlines, airplanes, and routes. I’ve also learned when to fast-forward through sections of the YouTube productions that are boring or of little relevance to my interests.

The ubiquity I mentioned above is itself quite valuable: The sheer number of video trip reports is astonishing, enabling me to harvest the collective wisdom of the crowded field.

I worry that airlines will ban such video reports.  A number of the productions posted mention being told by airline personnel to cease filming, and some vloggers have apparently been banned by some airlines.  Even with trip report flaws and shortcomings, I’d hate to lose the insights.

Here’s a cursory list of trip report videographers (merely a representative few as opposed to recommended; no URLs, but they are easy to find; VO means voiceover, to distinguish from reviewers who use only captions):

  • Wingin’ It! by Paul Lucas (voiceover, UK, also reviews trains, easygoing style)
  • The Luxury Travel Expert (captions, reviews hotels, resorts, and travel locations as well as air)
  • Sam Chui (VO)
  • Josh Cahill (VO, reviews all classes)
  • When I Travel The World (VO)
  • Nicholas Perez (VO, American, grates on me)
  • Nonstop Dan (VO, young, American)
  • Seat61 (captions, strictly rail, all excellent)
  • David’s been here David Hoffman (VO, sounds American, reviews lots of economy as well as business)
  • Casey Neistat (VO, American, young and brash, his fans include Wesley Snipes, other celebs)
  • The German Guys Air Travel (VO auf Deutsch)
  • Dennis Bunnik (Aussie, VO)
  • Soumendra Jena (VO, young, Indian, edgy)
  • The Points Guy UK (VO, young, 4 guys review 4 classes on same flight–really liked the contrasting and thoughtful videos)
  • Making It Happen Vlog (VO, quirky, young couple, fancy editing, good music, sound German)
  • Stay Classy Vlog (VO, Danish, young)
  • Ben Morris (VO, UK, young, Flight Fox)
  • Klailea (very young, American)
  • ITGC (India, young)
  • wpbstars.com (captions, short)
  • Flight Report Production (captions)
  • Silicon Valley Girl (VO, young)
  • Air Traveler (captions, well done)
  • Kara & Nate (VO, American couple)
  • My Trips (captions)
  • Flight Experience (captions)

“Papa’s got a brand new bag”

Actually, Papa’s got two brand new bags, with a tip of the hat to James Brown’s classic 1965 hit.

Musing about holiday gifts last month, I narrowed down the search for a replacement of my twenty year old Hartmann two-wheel roller to two-wheelers made by Zero Halliburton and Briggs & Riley (I am not a fan of spinners).  The old Hartmann has served me well, but is showing its age, as evident in these pictures:

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It was a tough call to choose between ZH and B&R. I finally decided to buy both, justifying the decision by sharing the bags with my wife.  I didn’t know which I’d like better for functionality and durability, and this way my wife and I have two “forever” bags we can use when we fly together.

Here are two views of the new Zero Halliburton (I fancied the brilliant red ZH available in the same model, but it was $50 more, so opted for the classic brushed aluminum that made the brand famous):

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It was an easy decision to buy both bags since I eventually found appealingly low prices. I got the Briggs & Riley from ebags.com (Amazon was nearly $100 more for the same model). Zero Halliburton’s best prices are on the ZH website, and the company had a deep discount sale going on to clear inventory of current models before launching newly designed cases in late January (2020).

Two pictures of the new Briggs & Riley (I liked the olive color, and it didn’t cost extra):

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When the new pieces arrived, I first measured them to compare with my old Hartmann, which is 22 x 15 x 10.  The Zero Halliburton is 21 x 15 x 8, and the Briggs & Riley is 21 x 14 x 9.  Doesn’t sound like much of a dimensional difference, but both the new pieces are quite a bit smaller than the Hartmann I’ve depended on for years, as can be readily seen from these pictures:

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Initial impressions:  While the two new ones are the legal size, the Hartmann has never been challenged by any airline anywhere and fits just fine in most every overhead compartments (excepting the Lilliputian overhead bins on some first gen RJs, which won’t take the other two, either). Of course the Hartmann holds more, just as it appears it would, so though I’m happy to have two bags that are “legal” size, I’m disappointed they are tinier than my old reliable two-wheeler.  Here’s what they look like when open:

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The February 2020 issue of Consumer Reports gives Briggs & Riley the top spot for carryon bags, with an overall satisfaction score of 92 and best in five categories measured: ease of carrying, wheelability, ease of packing, durability, and stowability.

I cannot account for why Zero Halliburton isn’t listed in the 21 carryon luggage brands (32 for checked bags) unless ZH was deemed too esoteric or costly.  If Zero Halliburton was omitted due to expense, then I find it curious, as the ZH and B&R bags were close in price.

Next month an old friend is joining me for another trip to the Kruger National Park in South Africa (see many posts about previous Kruger trips at www.allenonafrica.com). After nearly 30 years of frequently visiting the park, I have my routine down pat for 12-14 days and nights.

Knowing I am going to do laundry once or twice while there, I usually pack 6-7 of the basics (boxers, socks, tees, shirts), plus the clothes I wear to fly over. I pack one extra pair of khakis for a total of two, counting the pair I wear over. I always take two pairs of shoes, one of mesh sandals (which I pack) and the other running shoes (to wear going over and back). I do not pack outerwear, instead wearing a light jacket going and returning.

From experience I know that all of those items, plus my toiletries and a few other things, will fit into the Hartmann two-wheeler. So as I pondered the big size difference between the old Hartmann and the two new carryons, it occurred to me to test the new bags against what I always put in the Hartmann.

The Zero Halliburton appears to have the smallest interior and does not have the special compression technology built into the Briggs & Riley.  Thus I decided the ZH would be the acid test.  I assembled all the usual Kruger trip clothing and shoes to see if they’d fit, the only concession being to pack six, rather than seven, of the basic articles. Here are the results:

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The good news is that it all fit with a little room left for a couple of baseball caps for sun shade.  The two halves of the Zero Halliburton closed without forcing it.

However, the other items I usually throw in the Hartmann suitcase won’t fit in the Halliburton.  Things like my toiletries, reading material, reference books, Kruger maps, vitamins and medications (e.g., anti-malarial drugs), and binoculars.

But since I always take a second “personal items” bag—a small backpack—most of the items will instead fit in that, along with travel documents, Bose noise-canceling headphones, clothesline and clothespins for drying laundry, and such.

The smaller volume available forced me to pare down what I have always taken.  My friend is packing a pair of field glasses with stabilizing technology far superior to my 1990s model Nikon, so that will stay in Raleigh, as will my beloved, but bulky “Robert’s Birds of Southern Africa” (I found an abridged version that is slim and light instead).

Kruger trips, always 12-14 days, are normally the outer limit of my time away.  Therefore, the outcome of my experiment in packing is all good. If the new bags work for the Kruger, then they will be fine and dandy for my usual three, four, or five night business trips, even with business attire packed (yes, I still wear a coat and tie on business).  I’m jazzed to start using my new Briggs & Riley and Zero Halliburton bags!

Holiday travel gifts

GIVE ME BOSE WITH WIRES, THANK YOU VERY MUCH

My wife spent a week in Ireland over Thanksgiving, traveling via Aer Lingus, and I loaned her my aging, but still perfect Bose QuietComfort 15 noise-canceling headphones. Like me, she found them to be indispensable.  The over-the-ear wired model continues to be my top choice. Personally, I agree completely with David Rowell in The Travel Insider recent assessment that the myriad of features of other models and brands are tripe. And who needs Bluetooth?  David is right that it’s a pain, a technology that never got easier to use once introduced.

I wanted to buy my wife headphones like mine for Christmas, but Bose doesn’t make them anymore. The new models with all the unnecessary features hover around $300.  The discontinued model QuietComfort 15 are so much in demand that new ones sell for as much as $600 on Amazon.  After rooting around a bit online, I found a like-new used Bose QuietComfort 15 for $88 delivered, also from Amazon.

So-called “renewed” Bose model 15s seem to be selling for $150-180, but availability and pricing seems to be highly dynamic.  I checked Amazon for 10 days running, and prices were all over the place for used model 15s.

I GAVE MY HEART TO HARTMANN

As a Christmas gift to myself, which roller bag to buy to replace my faithful old two-wheel Hartmann?  Spinners are the rage, but they enrage me.  Those damn four wheels consume space and weight that could be used for stuff to pack, and the wheels often dangle out of airplane overhead compartments and prevent proper closure.

Trouble is, Hartmann has apparently discontinued my bag, which is airline “legal” (22 x 14 x 9 in) and suits me.  If I could, I would order a duplicate, but I cannot find the specific one.  This Briggs and Riley looks like the only bag that comes close, but it seems a bit smaller, and the cheapest price I can find is $400.

Another great option would be a Zero Halliburton bag.  Turns out they make a two-wheeler called the Zero Halliburton Geo Aluminum 3.0-Carry-on 2-Wheel Travel Case, just what the doctor ordered, and the right dimensions:  21 x 15 x 8.  Well, perfect except for the expense: $680 at Amazon.

Darned  impressive specs and features, though:  Made in America of anodized aluminum (strong as steel but only one-fourth the weight). Double-rib design for strength and durability. Three-stage dual-button handle system for quicker release for both left- and right-handed travelers (I’m a southpaw). Two TSA-accepted combination locks integrated into the draw-bolt latches. Seals airtight. Piano hinge to keep the shells of each case in alignment and to add additional strength to the seal. Two compartments with flat panels to hold clothes securely. Stain-resistant lining that’s non-abrasive to clothes. Global tracking anywhere in the world.

Pining for a Zero Halliburton, I found the same model direct from the maker for “just” $595. The price is still a sticking point for me, so I haven’t succumbed to my desire for the classic piece. Yet, anyway.

I am not wedded to any brand, Hartmann, ZH, or other.  Just want a 22 x 14 x 9, reasonably durable carryon two-wheel roller, not a four-wheel spinner.  Don’t care about color or brand (caveat: no pink polka dot bags, please).  Any advice from readers?  Many thanks in advance.

Before leaving luggage and associated doodads that go into it, let me put in a plug for a company that Joe Brancatelli pointed me to in his piece on bags. I have for some time needed a new toiletry kit to replace a canvas one that’s been around the world with me so many times that it would be a multi-million miler if it had a frequent flyer account.  It is finally falling apart.

Not wanting a classic-but-heavy leather Dopp kit, perusing Joe’s recommendations I eventually decided on a rugged canvas Red Oxx “Nomad Shave Kit” made in Billings, Montana.  The right size at 12 x 5 x 4 and only a half pound empty, it is built to last with heavy #10 YKK zippers with Fair Trade Monkey Fist Zip Knots for quick and easy zip open and close.  I was already thinking of buying one, but the clincher for me was watching the embedded video revealing what “Fair Trade Monkey Fist Zip Knots” means.  The Nomad is wrapped and under our tree for me.

GIVING OR “GIFTING”

Since it’s the season for presents, I’ll digress for a moment to ask what happened to the good old-fashioned term, “gift-giving.”  Giving someone a gift somehow got contracted into the nouveau word, “gifting,” a vinegary concoction that makes me cringe.

Does this new verb usage lead logically to a past tense? That is, if I gave someone a gift, do I now say that I “gafted” that person? Meaning if the past tense of “give” is “gave,” then the past tense of “gifted” must be “gafted.”  Which rhymes with shafted.

THE ULTIMATE TRAVEL GIFT

I discovered around-the-world fares in First Class in the 1980s and used them often for more than two decades.  Airlines partnered to accomplish the feat, such as the oneworld group of AA, BA, Cathay, Qantas, and the rest.

Sometimes called ATW or RTW (’round the world) fares, they were first priced at a standard $5024 for going around entirely in the Northern Hemisphere or $5524 for a combination of Northern and Southern Hemisphere travel.  East or West didn’t matter; I just had to keep going the same direction once I began.

ATW fares were a tremendous bargain, and I lost count of the number of trips I made in First Class and Business Class circling the globe.  There were rules, of course, like not being able to backtrack from one destination city to another unless it was part of onward travel that could not be avoided.  Some carriers sets limits on the time (six to twelve months, typically) and the number of stops.

Since front cabin fares skyrocketed, I lost track of ATW/RTW fares. But I know they are out of sight now.  No matter the cost, I cannot imagine a more spectacular, mind-blowing holiday gift!

December travel musing

In that peculiar annual period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s when it seems not much work gets done, I counter the trend by taking stock of the year just ending and to think about and plan travel for the coming 12 months.  For me, it’s a time for reflection about all things related to travel.  Here are some of my reflections,

HOLIDAY AIRFARE BARGAINS (NOT!)

Lots of airline come-ons in my inbox starting in November, but all in coach.  I saw only one bargain in Premium Economy this year, and that was on Cathay Pacific and ended after the Thanksgiving weekend.  Zero deals in Business Class.

The coach deals on Qatar are especially good, like Houston to Nairobi for $695 round trip for travel Jan 11 to May 19 next year if you buy by Dec 15.  But I won’t worry if I miss this sale because there is sure to be another on Qatar in a few days or next week, latest.  Qatar economy class is rumored to be pretty good—meaning it is not as uncomfortable as some other airlines—but heck, it’s still coach.

The dearth of deals in PE and Biz Class is made worse for me by the fact that business travel to Johannesburg (JNB) is strong and South African Airways is on the ropes. Both factors mean steady demand for butts in business class to that part of the world.  I go back to the Kruger National Park in South Africa nearly every year, and while coach seats are as little as $880 round trip, I can’t get a business class fare to JNB any more for less than about $4,500, often closer to $5,500.

I’ve flown to Jo’burg countless times since 1991—quite a lot in the last few years—and I’ve never seen it so consistently expensive to fly up front.  I snagged a good Premium Economy fare on Delta for a trip I am making there in Feb-Mar, 2020, but even PE fares have risen dramatically since my purchase date.

TO BUY MILES OR NOT

This time of year American Airlines usually sends me offers to supplement my AAdvantage miles by buying more.  I bought a hundred thousand miles from AA a few years back at a good rate, which miles contributed to an AAdvantage award RDU to Tanzania on Qatar in Business Class.

Sure enough, I got this year’s AA email yesterday, and the top offer is 70% bonus miles if I purchase 100,000-150,000 AAdvantage miles.  But it’s no bargain at $0.032/mile to buy 150,000 ($5,036.38), though with 105,000 bonus miles, that drops it to $0.022/mile.

Still, I wonder, is that a bargain?  I am not sure any more what that total of 255,000 AAdvantage miles buys me based on the past year’s steep award level increases, but certainly not the reasonable mileage award in business on Qatar of several years ago. Instead, for about $5,000 I can usually find a business class fare to South Africa, so why use miles?  And that’s just one example.  I passed on the AAdvantage offer this year.

WEDNESDAY BEFORE THANKSGIVING USED TO BE THE BUSIEST TRAVEL DAY OF THE YEAR

My home Raleigh/Durham Airport (RDU) saw its busiest one-day travel on that Sunday after Thanksgiving at 54,800.  Used to be Wednesday before Thanksgiving was the busiest travel day of the year, but now it’s the Sunday afterward.  I guess that, because of widespread American prosperity, many folks can take off a day or two, or even the whole week of Thanksgiving, which spreads out the demand.

During four decades of flying home from consulting gigs at Thanksgiving, however, it was always Wednesday, and always had to be booked at least six to nine months in advance to get a fare that didn’t make my clients shriek in pain when I sought reimbursement.

RDU WANTS A NONSTOP TO CHINA

Staying with RDU, local business leaders—including many tech company execs—have long sought to bag a direct flight to China. RDU already boasts nonstops to London (AA) and Paris (DL).

But first the airport needs a new runway.  That will be part of an airport master plan for the future that RDU calls “Vision 2040” and includes adding 23 new gates and bringing the rental car and TNCs (Uber, Lyft) to a close-in building within easy walking distance from Terminal 2, which most of RDU’s airlines use.  I am excited about the coming improvements and gung-ho about a possible nonstop to China.

RDU QUARRY QUARREL

The airport’s needs notwithstanding, a controversy took root in the past year regarding property owned by RDU that it wants to lease to a stone quarry operation.  The land is contiguous to heavily-forested Umstead State Park, a popular hiking and biking destination for Triangle residents. Some park advocates don’t like the idea of a quarry, even though it’s entirely on airport property and will supply a much-needed income stream to the airport for several decades before being restored for recreational uses. Unlike highways, airports have no steady federal and state funding, instead relying on periodic, unpredictable federal and state grants.

Our airport has authority to make the quarry deal.  The issue, like many these days, became polarized and over-simplified, with anti-quarry forces ignoring the greater need as well as the overarching economic benefit to the region of RDU.  With airport passenger traffic surpassing ten million per year and contributing $8.5 billion to the region’s economy, RDU is essential to our ability to absorb the growth we are experiencing in this part of North Carolina.